Arizona State Study

ArizonaLand of painted deserts, the Grand Canyon, and snowbirds, this is an Arizona State Study . . .

Arizona History

Arizona had belonged to the Hopi, Navajo, Apache, and 19 other tribes.  Then it was claimed by the Spanish in the mid 1500’s, being actually inhabited first by missionaries and then by ranchers.  Then when Mexico gained its independence in 1822 the territory became Mexican.  In 1848 America won the land in a war with Mexico (US troops actually marched clear to Mexico City and could have taken the whole country, but accepted the only the more northern areas in a treaty).  In 1853 the US completed the Gadsden Purchase and gained a large area of Arizona land in the south.

During the U.S. Civil War, Arizona had a confederate flag flying over their territory.  Arizona was made a state February 14, 1912.

Monument Valley in northeastern Arizona. Photo by Gerd A.T. Müller, CC license, Wikimedia.

Arizona Fabulous Facts

  • The state flower is the saguaro cactus bloom.
  • Phoenix has more kidnappings than any other city in the U.S. perpetrated by illegal aliens almost exclusively.
  • The state capital is Phoenix.
This is a view of Phoenix with the downtown in the foreground and the city sprawling away into the distance. Phoenix has a population of 1.4 million people and is the 6th largest city in the US. Photo by DDPed, CC license, Wikimedia.
  • State Motto: Ditat Deus, which means God Enriches.
  • The official state neck ware is the bolo tie.  Yeah, I know . . . official state neck ware???
  • The Grand Canyon is in Arizona.
  • They have a “right to work” law which means you can’t be denied employment for not belonging to a union.
  • Camels were brought into Arizona for transport across the desert before the days of automobiles and interstates.
  • Arizona (very wisely) ignores daylight saving time changes.
  • Arizona produces more copper than any other state.
  • The London Bridge was dismantled, shipped to Arizona, and rebuilt in Lake Havasu. I left a link in case you, understandably, don’t believe me on this point.

    This is London Bridge in the town of Lake Havasu, Arizona. Photo by Ken Lund, CC license, Wikimedia.
  • About 6.5 million people live in Arizona.
  • Arizona manufactures many products including microchips for Intel among other things.
  • Tourism is one of the states biggest industries, especially in the area of “snowbirds”, and of course the Grand Canyon.
This is the Colorado River in far northern Arizona, near Page, Arizona and the Grand Canyon. Photo by Adrille, CC license, Wikimedia.

Map Exploration

On an Arizona Map label the largest cities, the Grand Canyon, and color in the Indian Reservations.  Here’s a map of Indian Tribes to help.

Arizona map web

Additional Layers

  • Arizona wasn’t colonized by Mexico until the 1840s and then only very lightly.  The Mexican-American war gave the territory to the United States, but today many Mexicans claim that Arizona and other areas of the southwest should still belong to Mexico.  What do you think?
  • As you know by now in the news, Arizona has a big problem with illegal immigration.  There are trails of trash in the desert along immigration routes, dead bodies from people who didn’t make it through the dry heat, increased crime, drug running, organized gang activity, and massive strain on government services and medical facilities.  Discuss this stuff with your kids.  What do you think of it all?  What would you do if people were coming on your land to attack your family or even just to use your resources without your permission (like sleeping in your house rent free for example)?  But what about people who really need help?  What should Arizona do?  Should the state behave differently than an individual should?  Why?  It’s not a simple issue.
  • Visit the Grand Canyon in person if you possibly can.  If you can’t make it visit on the web.

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